How Microsoft ClickOnce Platform Benefits ECM Deployments for Capture, Document Management & eForms

ClickOnce is a deployment technology that enables you to create self-updating Windows-based applications that can be installed and run with minimal user interaction. ClickOnce deployment provides 3 major benefits for any .NET application:

  • Updates are provided automatically, downloading only those parts of the application that have changed.
  • Each application is self-contained and cannot interfere with other applications.
  • Deployment enables non-administrative users to install, granting only those security permissions necessary for the application.

As manufacturers of an ECM platform built on the .NET Framework, we are able to take advantage of ClickOnce to provide simple deployment of the complex and powerful applications we create. Personally, I’ve found that ClickOnce strikes an excellent balance between the two things most often encountered in enterprise environments: requirements for rich client applications that can be frequently and rapidly updated, and the simple access and deployment thin client web applications are known for.

When software needs to be deployed to many users across an entire enterprise organization, like is often the case with our content management product, ILINX Content Store, ClickOnce successfully gets the software where it needs to be, when it needs to be there. This also holds true for our capture and workflow product, ILINX Capture, which requires complex interaction with both other software suites and several classes of image capture hardware.

But what if your platform has limitations that prevents you from taking this route, forcing you to package the software into a .MSI file instead? This is adequate for some situations, but quickly becomes a pain to deploy proportional to the number of machines it needs to be installed on.

Facing this challenge with our electronic forms product, ILINX eForms, we have found a workaround that allows us to avoid the headache of one-at-a-time deployment .MSI files create. In short, the same API used to build the standard ILINX eForms client is available for use in building custom .NET applications, which allows you the freedom and flexibility to integrate ILINX eForms into your own .NET software. When combining this benefit with even basic ClickOnce configuration, you end up with a strong, rich-client application that can be seamlessly deployed and updated across your organization as needed in a matter of seconds.

But what about building out the custom app itself? The highlights of that process will be covered in a future entry, but if you’re ready to go right now, just open up the Help file in your copy of the ILINX eForms Designer and take a look at the Standalone Application contents section for some guidelines to help get you started.

Jesse Kinney
Solutions Developer
ImageSource, Inc.

Failover Cluster Troubleshooting

There’s nothing quite like logging in to a customer’s system first thing Monday morning only to be greeted with this:

Cluster_report

I discovered this when I wasn’t able to log into the customer’s ILINX Capture implementation. The logged error (failure to locate the SQL Server) led me to take a look at the SQL Server’s configuration to confirm that its service was not running on either node of the cluster, and the error I got when trying to start that (a clustered resource could not be activated) led me to check on the clustered resources themselves.
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Indexing Tables in Kofax-Based Environments

We recently had a customer who needed to migrate off of an aging and highly customized Capture/indexing/workflow one-off solution. At the center of many of their form types in this system was a repeatable field collection object that functioned much like how you would expect a .NET DataTable control to function – values could be added horizontally to the current “row”, and at the end of it you could hit enter and a new “row” would be added. As you moved through, you also had the ability to validate the line item as a whole. In other words, nothing too out-of-the-ordinary.

Unfortunately, this stood out as a red flag for both myself and my coworker when we first saw it, since we were migrating the client to Kofax Capture. There’s nothing inherently wrong with Kofax’s flagship product, in fact it is an excellent tool for getting content where it needs to be, often in record time. One thing it doesn’t do well out-of-the-box, however, is table fields. Defining one looks normal enough, but when you actually get the chance to index them, each column ends up being a standard index field. Needless to say, turning the table 90 degrees counter-clockwise and forcing keyers to manually delimit values is not an ideal experience, especially when 99% of your form is tables that need to be indexed. Continue reading

Development Mindset when utilizing ILINX eForms

Those familiar with software development should know the Waterfall software development methodology very well. For those who don’t, it’s basically this:
1. Perform discovery/gather requirements
2. Build out the solution based on the requirements provided
3. Perform User Acceptance Testing (UAT)
4. Correct issues found during testing and resubmit for UAT
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 as necessary
6. When the solution is accepted, prepare to move it into Production and do so
7. Support as necessary post-Production deployment

As a rule, we try to stay close to this approach when working through customer engagements, and regardless of the product we’re implementing it usually works very well. Continue reading

Exporting Records Using KTM Medical Claims Add-on & Kofax Export Connector

Kofax provides an add-on pack for their Transformation Modules product to handle CMS-1500 (formerly HCFA) and CMS-1450 (alternatively, UB-04) medical claims forms called the KTM Medical Claims Add-on package. Related to this package is the Kofax Export Connector for Medical Claims. This Export Connector allows for the data captured off of said forms to be formatted in the HIPAA-compliant EDI/ASC X12 837 formats (to be exact, 837 Professional for the CMS1500 and 837 Institutional for the UB04).

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