How to fix an error when configuring Active Directory Federation Services

While recently working to deploy an Active Directory Federation Services (ADFS) instance on a Server 2012 system, I ran into an issue. When I tried to do the initial configuration of the ADFS service from the ADFS console, there was an error that said the Windows Internal Database (WID) could not be started. This WID service is required for the ADFS service to function. I have included the text from the error below, which is very simple to fix once you know the root cause. Continue reading

No COM object available in Component Services snap-in

I have been working with Windows Server 2008 R2 64bit and Windows 7 64bit a lot lately. In doing so, I have noticed a problem when installing a specific product that requires a COM server. When I launch the MMC to access the Component Services snap-in, I find the COM object for this software doesn’t exist. I have double-checked this until I was blue in the face. Where is that COM object? I have properly installed and can use the product, but it simply doesn’t exist in the DCOM config portion of Component Services. Like all good IT professionals, I turn to Google. (The link below further explains the problem and solution for this.) Apparently, Windows removed a process called Registry Reflection from Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 OS’s. Registry Reflection was a process that would replicate registry keys between both 32bit and 64bit registry views. Since this was removed, all registered 32bit COM objects are only available in the 32bit version of the MMC. Once you access those objects through the 32bit MMC they will replicate and become available to you in the 64bit version. To access the 32bit version of the MMC, run this command “mmc -32” from the command line.

Read more about this solution by visiting Maarten’s blog - My COM server is gone from Component Services (DCOMCNFG)

Andrew D. Skovran
Support Engineer
ImageSource, Inc.

Enabling Full-Text Search in ILINX

I recently enabled full-text on an ILINX system and thought it would be a good idea to share the procedure here. ILINX leverages the MSSQL full-text capabilities so the process is mainly a matter of making sure everything is setup properly on the database side. Here are the steps I followed.

1.     Confirm Full-Text is installed and enabled on the SQL server

First I had to determine if Full-Text was installed on the SQL server. To do this I executed the following query:

select fulltextserviceproperty(‘isfulltextinstalled’)

If the query returns a ‘1’, full-text is installed on the server.

Next, I needed to confirm that full-text is enabled for the ILINX Content Store database. To do this I executed the following query against the ILINX Content Store database:

Continue reading

Development Mindset when utilizing ILINX eForms

Those familiar with software development should know the Waterfall software development methodology very well. For those who don’t, it’s basically this:
1. Perform discovery/gather requirements
2. Build out the solution based on the requirements provided
3. Perform User Acceptance Testing (UAT)
4. Correct issues found during testing and resubmit for UAT
5. Repeat steps 3 and 4 as necessary
6. When the solution is accepted, prepare to move it into Production and do so
7. Support as necessary post-Production deployment

As a rule, we try to stay close to this approach when working through customer engagements, and regardless of the product we’re implementing it usually works very well. Continue reading

Creating a Java keystore

When working with WebLogic server you will inevitably have to create some Java keystores along the way. The Java keytool or OpenSSL can accomplish most everything you would need to do but sometimes I like using something UI based to do some of the tasks. That is where a tool like KeyStore Explorer can come in quite handy.

Continue reading

SQL Server Management

In my experience I have noticed that many different companies do not manage their database correctly, or even at all.  I have included a link to the Microsoft TechNet article describing strategies for managing your SQL database.  There are lots of helpful hints pertaining to log management, backup and restore procedures, rebuilding faulty system databases, importing and exporting data, and even copying databases from machine to machine.  This light reading will make you more aware of some possible issues and provide you with basic knowledge of recommended procedures to get the most out of your SQL Server.

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee210540%28v=sql.105%29.aspx

Andrew Skovran
Support Engineer
ImageSource, Inc.